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"An Old Camera Tells Old Stories," by Yoad Vered, Secondary 3, West Island College, Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Qc (3rd Prize, 2015 QAHN Heritage Essay Contest)

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"An Old Camera Tells Old Stories," by Yoad Vered, Secondary 3, West Island College, Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Qc (3rd Prize, 2015 QAHN Heritage Essay Contest)

Stories come in many shapes and sizes; they come in books, in songs, and even in pictures. Pictures can tell stories, because each one is worth a thousand words. When looking through an album full of photographs, one can see and imagine a variation of stories, from different times, places, and points of view. Pictures are a real snapshot of time, and every single one has its very own story to tell.

With pictures, the youth can see how the past once was. With pictures, historians can observe and learn about important events. In fact, the most significant historical events from the last few centuries were all captured on camera. For example, today, we have pictures of Neil Armstrong landing on the moon. Today, we have pictures of the Holocaust. These pictures let us observe our past and learn more about it.

A picture is a snapshot of time that travels through the years. Each one, carrying an old story to teach about the past’s heritage and maybe even keep a memory. “When I look at my old pictures, all I can see is what I used to be but am no longer. I think: What I can see is what I am not,” once said Aleksandar Hemon

We all have pictures, because we take them daily. And yet, every picture is different. Every single one tells a story that is different from another, and this is why I strongly recommend that you photograph what most matters to you. This way, you can keep it as a memory forever, and help the people of the future learn about today.