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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(Organization)
(Organization)
(History Article)
In 1668, Father François Salignac de Fénelon founded a school and a mission post for the Indians n the actual site of our City. This first mission was called “La Présentation”. Father Fénelon was from a noble family whose insignia bore an eagle. On the City of Dorval’s crest, the eagle was introduced symbolically. In fact, it represents in a heraldic fashion the Dorval airport.
(History Article)
Led by the brilliant Hall of Famers Harry Trihey and Arthur Farrell, the Montreal Shamrocks, also known as the “Fighting Irish,” were an Irish Catholic hockey club that revolutionized the sport on their way to winning two Stanley Cups in 1899 and 1900. Formed out of the old Montreal Crystals Hockey Club in 1895, the Shamrocks were owned by the Shamrock Amateur Athletic Association, which also operated the legendary Shamrocks Lacrosse Club.
(Reflection)
“There are years that ask questions and years that answer” – Zora Hurston
(History Article)
The City of Westmount has a population of 20,548 residents as of 2009 who reside within the 3.9 square kilometre area on the southwestern slopes of Mount Royal surrounded by the City of Montreal. The Westmount Historical Association exists, “to obtain and classify all historical and similar material about the City of Westmount which might be available and useful,” for the understanding of the development of this city within a city. This was the mandate of the Westmount Historical Association when it was founded in 1944 and continues to guide our existence today.
(Arts & Culture Article)
Seventy years is a long survival time for a community theatre troupe, and especially so in English-speaking Quebec. At seventy, the Montreal West Operatic Society is one of the longest-surviving in Canada, and the hands-down oldest troupe specializing, as many of them do, in the works of Gilbert & Sullivan.
(Reflection)
I don’t remember the knives but the smells are still sharp, and part of the memories. Growing up Black in Little Burgundy: did I grow up Black, or did I grow up and become Black? Where did it all begin? My experiences of being Black-are entwined with my sense of belonging, of community. It was a multi-ethnic community, with Chinese families sharing my street with French families. And right around my corner was a whole new world: Italian neighbours who lived in their own enclave with smells of wine, spices and other herbs I still don’t have words for.
(Reflection)
An integral part of Montreal’s linguistic Mosaic is an institution that began its existence here in the early days of the 1930’s Depression. Like the country, it has grown in size, sophistication, and linguistic variety, and it has experienced difficulties, but always its purpose has been the intellectual growth and integration of the individual into the (Anglophone) community, the province and the nation. It has also, of course, exported its product internationally for worldwide benefit.
(Reflection)
(Reflection)
Playwright’s Notes
(Reflection)
How did you come to be living here, to be a “Montrealer”?
(History Article)
When married and still living in Montreal, Mother [Mary Ann Swift Wickham] took us children to St. Lambert when ill in summer. She boarded at an inn on the riverbank kept by the Irvings and known as Irving’s Hotel. This was then a roadhouse, where farmers passing to market in the city by ferry, or ice-bridge, stopped to refresh themselves. St. Lambert air was thought to cure “summer complaint” a cause of great infant mortality in those days. The sufferer was rowed upon the river. However, the fresh milk obtainable was more likely the cause of improvement.
(History Article)
Macdonald College in Ste. Anne de Bellevue is remembered as a bequest of Sir William Christopher Macdonald, and it was a gift of extraordinary generosity. Not only did he perceive the need for an agricultural and teaching college, but he also acquired the land, ordered the design of the buildings, paid the costs of construction and endowed the institution. The college was only one of many gifts from possibly the most generous philanthropist in the history of our country. What do we really know about the man and his own history?
(History Article)
A cornerstone of Montreal’s immigrant heritage stands at the corner of Bagg and Clark streets in Montreal’s now-trendy Plateau district.
(Reflection)
During Quebec’s political turmoil of the1970s, when family, friends and colleagues departed Montreal in droves, it seemed for some of us who remained as if life’s anchors, and life’s fun, had been yanked away.
(Reflection)
Find a durable surface that withstands outdoor wear and tear Utilize high-quality grout (adhesive that binds and unifies the mosaic) Select a conventional shade of grout (it will be neutral to the eye) Follow the grouting instructions thoroughly Should you omit a step in the process you may risk losing the mosaic altogether (you cannot have a solid mosaic without having a solid foundation) Go to an arts supply store to find tesserae (mosaic pieces)
(Reflection)
The above is the kitschy slogan of Montreal's most unusual new radio station, CJRS -- Radio Shalom, at 1650 on the a.m. dial. What is more unusual is that CJRS is North America's only full-time Jewish station. For 24 hours a day, 6 days a week (we're off the air for the Sabbath) a multiplicity of Jewish sounds cascades from our studios near Montreal's landmark Orange Julep.
(Reflection)
To get an appreciation of Greenfield Park today, it is necessary to look back nearly one hundred years to 1911, the year the municipality was founded. At that time all the land was either used for agriculture, abandoned or overgrown with bush. Montreal, only five miles away across the St. Lawrence River, was booming. Immigrants were hoping for better than the when they arrived in Canada, often from crowded British cities, but they frequently ended up settling in poor, polluted and cramped industrial neighbourhoods like Pointe St. Charles and Griffintown.
(Reflection)
I am born and raised in Ontario, at a time and in a place where we identified ourselves not only by our ancestry, but by the specific region within the British Empire from which our ancestors came. Back then I was Green Irish, from the town of Mullingar, county Westmeath (even though both my parents were born in Ontario). The collision of various social and personal factors required that I have some identity, and for many Canadians identity is a quest in itself.